November 28, 2012
itasuntzu:

in southern france from foto leonne

itasuntzu:

in southern france from foto leonne

November 28, 2012

Here are some pieces Hallie Bateman created inspired from Projet En Vue interview. We featured her work along with interview portraits and cassete tape recordings at our MacArthur B Arthur exhibition last June. 

November 27, 2012
This is a shot of Sati and some goats, on a trip in Switzerland in between working on Projet En Vue ‘Paris’. check out more photos from his trip at - Foto Leonne 

This is a shot of Sati and some goats, on a trip in Switzerland in between working on Projet En Vue ‘Paris’. check out more photos from his trip at - Foto Leonne 

November 27, 2012

Our first exhibition was held on June 2 and 3, 2012 at Macarthur B Arthur Gallery in Oakland. The show featured large prints from the interviews along with with a cassete tape with a section of the audio. The individual “listening stations” provided an intimate environment for visitors to interact with the photograph and story of the subjects.  - - - Read and view more HERE.

September 10, 2012

Meet Kevin. We did an interview with Kevin in Oakland at his space MacArthur B Arthur. Listen/read the interview here - Projet En Vue.

September 10, 2012
An illustration by Hallie Bateman that goes goes perfectly along with some of why we created Projet En Vue “In this era of advanced technology we are constantly connected to a global network of people, yet we are losing our connection to our communities and to the people within them. We hope that this project inspires people to truly connect with those around them, share thoughts and experiences, and truly learn from one another again. ” -  from Projet En Vue Mission Statement.

An illustration by Hallie Bateman that goes goes perfectly along with some of why we created Projet En Vue “In this era of advanced technology we are constantly connected to a global network of people, yet we are losing our connection to our communities and to the people within them. We hope that this project inspires people to truly connect with those around them, share thoughts and experiences, and truly learn from one another again. ” -  from Projet En Vue Mission Statement.

September 10, 2012
here is an illustration by Hallie Bateman.

here is an illustration by Hallie Bateman.

12:50am
Filed under: hallie bateman 
September 10, 2012
Here is a shot from our exhibition during set up at Macarthur B Arthur in June. We displayed 18” x 14” prints from Projet En Vue interviews along with cassette tapes playing short audio portraits from the project some drawn portraits by Hallie Bateman. We plan to have a show in each city we interview. This summer we worked on Projet En Vue ‘Paris’ so soon as we finish designing and printing our ‘Oakland’ book we will be working on getting our new content up.

Here is a shot from our exhibition during set up at Macarthur B Arthur in June. We displayed 18” x 14” prints from Projet En Vue interviews along with cassette tapes playing short audio portraits from the project some drawn portraits by Hallie Bateman. We plan to have a show in each city we interview. This summer we worked on Projet En Vue ‘Paris’ so soon as we finish designing and printing our ‘Oakland’ book we will be working on getting our new content up.

September 10, 2012
thepeoplesrecord:

Hong Kong backs down on China education plan after protestsSeptember 9, 2012
Hong Kong’s government withdrew plans for a compulsory Chinese school curriculum on Saturday after tens of thousands took to the streets in protest at what they said was a move to “brainwash” students.
The decision by the island’s pro-China Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to make the curriculum voluntary for schools came a day before elections for just over half the seats of Hong Kong’s 70-seat legislature.
“We don’t want the recent controversy to affect the operations of schools, nor do we want to see the harmony of the education environment to be affected,” said Leung, noting the move was a “major policy amendment”.
“They have made a substantive concession,” said Joseph Wong, a former senior government official and political scientist.
“One may say it’s too late, but better late than never. I think it will defuse the issue, maybe not entirely, but at least it will remove a lot of the tensions … This is a great day for Hong Kong’s civil society.”
For the past week, thousands of protesters have ringed Hong Kong’s government headquarters, camped out in tents, dressed in black and chanting for the withdrawal of the curriculum they said was Communist Party propaganda aimed at indoctrinating new generations of primary and secondary school students.
The education issue is one of several key issues for voters along with housing and the increasing number of visitors from the mainland coming into the city.
DEMOCRACY CAMP
Leung was sworn in in July after being elected by a committee filled with business professionals, tycoons and Beijing loyalists. Hong Kong’s seven million people have no say in who becomes their chief executive.
A strong showing by the opposition pro-democracy camp would make it more difficult for the chief executive to pass policies in a fractious legislature.
The polls may be a chance for voters to express anti-China sentiment, with many protesters still camped outside the government headquarters after the apparent back-down, still unsatisfied with the policy change.
“This is a cunning move to put the ball in the people’s court. Even though they say schools are free to choose … in the coming years I expect the government and Beijing to use hidden means to try to pressure more and more schools to take up the scheme,” said young activist Mak Chi-ho.
“What Hong Kong needs is real universal suffrage.”
Hong Kong is a freewheeling capitalist hub which enjoys a high degree of autonomy, but Beijing has resisted public pressure for full democracy and has maintained a high degree of influence in political, media and academic spheres.
The past week’s protests have included hunger strikes and the parading of a replica of the Goddess of Democracy statue which was erected in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square during the 1989 demonstrations and crackdown.
The latest outbreak of discontent represents yet another headache for Beijing, after Chinese President Hu Jintao appealed in July for Hong Kong to maintain unity, with Beijing’s own leaders grappling with an imminent leadership transition.
Source
Power to Hong Kong! 

thepeoplesrecord:

Hong Kong backs down on China education plan after protests
September 9, 2012

Hong Kong’s government withdrew plans for a compulsory Chinese school curriculum on Saturday after tens of thousands took to the streets in protest at what they said was a move to “brainwash” students.

The decision by the island’s pro-China Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to make the curriculum voluntary for schools came a day before elections for just over half the seats of Hong Kong’s 70-seat legislature.

“We don’t want the recent controversy to affect the operations of schools, nor do we want to see the harmony of the education environment to be affected,” said Leung, noting the move was a “major policy amendment”.

“They have made a substantive concession,” said Joseph Wong, a former senior government official and political scientist.

“One may say it’s too late, but better late than never. I think it will defuse the issue, maybe not entirely, but at least it will remove a lot of the tensions … This is a great day for Hong Kong’s civil society.”

For the past week, thousands of protesters have ringed Hong Kong’s government headquarters, camped out in tents, dressed in black and chanting for the withdrawal of the curriculum they said was Communist Party propaganda aimed at indoctrinating new generations of primary and secondary school students.

The education issue is one of several key issues for voters along with housing and the increasing number of visitors from the mainland coming into the city.

DEMOCRACY CAMP

Leung was sworn in in July after being elected by a committee filled with business professionals, tycoons and Beijing loyalists. Hong Kong’s seven million people have no say in who becomes their chief executive.

A strong showing by the opposition pro-democracy camp would make it more difficult for the chief executive to pass policies in a fractious legislature.

The polls may be a chance for voters to express anti-China sentiment, with many protesters still camped outside the government headquarters after the apparent back-down, still unsatisfied with the policy change.

“This is a cunning move to put the ball in the people’s court. Even though they say schools are free to choose … in the coming years I expect the government and Beijing to use hidden means to try to pressure more and more schools to take up the scheme,” said young activist Mak Chi-ho.

“What Hong Kong needs is real universal suffrage.”

Hong Kong is a freewheeling capitalist hub which enjoys a high degree of autonomy, but Beijing has resisted public pressure for full democracy and has maintained a high degree of influence in political, media and academic spheres.

The past week’s protests have included hunger strikes and the parading of a replica of the Goddess of Democracy statue which was erected in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square during the 1989 demonstrations and crackdown.

The latest outbreak of discontent represents yet another headache for Beijing, after Chinese President Hu Jintao appealed in July for Hong Kong to maintain unity, with Beijing’s own leaders grappling with an imminent leadership transition.

Source

Power to Hong Kong! 

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

September 10, 2012
good bye summer, ready to get back on the grind.

good bye summer, ready to get back on the grind.

(via have--not)

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